Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Senator Laughingstock (R), Louisiana

I know this quote has been highlighted throughout the New Orleans blogosphere and the rest of the country but I was just on the phone with my dad and he was asking me about what I thought about how our Senator killed the bailout.

I said I had to read this to him and I did, verbatim:


Morgan Johnson, president of the United Auto Workers local representing General Motors workers in Shreveport, said Friday that Sen. David Vitter's role in blocking an auto bailout indicates "he's chosen to play Russian roulette" with Louisiana jobs and the national economy.

"I don't know what Sen. Vitter has against GM or the United Auto Workers or the entire domestic auto industry; whatever it is, whatever he thinks we've done, it's time for him to forgive us, just like Sen. Vitter has asked the citizens of Louisiana to forgive him, " said Johnson, president of Local 2166. Otherwise, Johnson said of Vitter, it would appear, "He'd rather pay a prostitute than pay auto workers."


There was immediate laughter, then a weird silence, then a lot more laughter.

Morgan Johnson, you should get a promotion out of this. How 'bout you and me get jobs with Rep. Charlie Melancon?

Seriously, I still cannot believe that Vitty had the nerve to step out on this thing. It's not like he's Corker from Tennessee or Shelby in Alabama, who are both clearly beholden to the interests of the foreign auto makers.

We actually have GM jobs here in Louisiana. I can just picture the campaign ads now:

Forget his personal indiscretions, David Vitter has accomplished a lot for the state of Louisiana. He killed a bill that would have saved hundreds of factory jobs in Shreveport. So as you can see, he's still just as effective at stomping the little guy as he was before his credibility was rocked by a sex scandal.

Because of the way the GOP has made gains here in Louisiana and because of Sen. Vitter's ability to shrink away from the bright lights, I was actually starting to think that he might have a chance at reelection.

Not no more. This was the nail in the coffin.

8 comments:

jeffrey said...

Because of the way the GOP has made gains here in Louisiana and because of Sen. Vitter's ability to shrink away from the bright lights, I was actually starting to think that he might have a chance at reelection.

Not no more. This was the nail in the coffin.


I know this is probably a year too early but would you are to wager something there?

Seriously. This only helps Vitter in Louisiana. I also think that the GOP is killing this argument nationally. The auto-bailout debate has been framed in such a stupid way that it has probably killed EFCA... at least for 2009.

E said...

I agree with you about the way the GOP has won the argument nationally. I'd also agree that EFCA is dead for 2009.

But David Vitter got smacked around really hard. Locally and nationally.

I'll consider a wager once we have an idea of who the Democratic challenger is going to be.

John Neely Kennedy anyone?

jeffrey said...

Ha ha ha God I almost hope....

Ryan said...

EFCA ain't dead in 2009, boys. It's still gonna pass the House. The question is whether it will pass the Senate.

I think it will.

Tim said...

This stance against the auto workers is just a small part of his "comeback" plan. I see Senator Vitter borrowing strategy from Aaron Broussard. Remember right after Katrina when Metairie had flooded not from broken floodwalls but from backflow through the unmanned pumps? Everybody hated Broussard. There was talk of recall. But Broussard did not fret. He went to work--against the Corps. At every opportunity, he battled the Corps and cast himself as the one guy who could defeat the horrid Corps bureacracy. And he won re-election easily. It sure looks like Vitter is copying Broussard on this one.

Peace,

Tim

E said...

I think EFCA is going to be tough to get through a filibuster. The GOP hates it. Hates it.

Anonymous said...

Sure, the GOP hates it. But Collins, Voinovich, and Specter are folks that IIRC are on board.

And Voinovich and Specter face the voters in '10.

E said...

This is true. But might we also expect that a couple of Southern Dems would feel pressure in the opposite direction?