Friday, May 29, 2009

Pinch me

From the Lagniappe section today:

Just as New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin is beginning to recall what he was doing a few months after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city, along comes a reminder of what he was doing just a few days before the storm struck.

On Aug. 23, 2005, when forecasts still were predicting that New Orleans would be spared the brunt of the storm, Nagin was on the steps of Gallier Hall, filming some of his scenes for the family adventure tale "Labou," the mayor's acting debut.

The movie, written and directed by Greg Aronowitz, was released directly to DVD on May 19.

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In the film, three children get lost in a swamp near New Orleans while hunting for the ghost of a 19th century pirate. During their adventure, they meet the titular swamp creature (whose whistling race -- part Yoda, part Gremlin -- is said to have inspired the birth of jazz music), stumble upon a crooked development deal that can be traced back to City Hall and discover the pirate's treasure.

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Nagin plays Mayor Adams, New Orleans' corrupt leader, who agrees to seize privately owned land in order to sell it to oil company executives looking for a spot to build a huge refinery, regardless of the effect on the environment. When confronted with revelations about the deal, Mayor Adams responds, "There were offers, but nothing firm was put on the table."

Accepting such a role was a risky choice for a sitting mayor. Those wondering if the risk pays off can rest assured that Denzel Washington's career is safe.


Wow. I don't there's anything anyone can add. Just wow.

3 comments:

Tim said...

Hindsight is, as they say, 20/20. Before Katrina hit, I thought Hizzoner was doing a better than average job. Now I see clearly how wrong I was. If Mr. Nagin had time to play in a movie, he obviously was not taking the responsibilities as full-time mayor of a city with real problems very seriously.

Peace,

Tim

Anonymous said...

"...Nagin plays Mayor Adams, New Orleans' corrupt leader, who agrees to seize privately owned land in order to sell it to oil company executives looking for a spot to build a huge refinery, regardless of the effect on the environment..."

How ironic that the same acting mayor, in November 2007, offered to clearcut an entire Lower Mid-City neighborhood in spite of the fact that it remains predominantly residential, recovering and privately-owned.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for also noticing the absurdity! Saw that in the paper last week too...

-AP