Monday, June 29, 2009

Soup to Dessert?



Or are we just demolishing Lower Mid-City to desert downtown?

12 comments:

Puddinhead said...

Still with the ficticious "Lower Mid City".....Well, words are the weapon of the propagandist...

hubig said...

Propaganda? You mean "Downtown" should now mean from the river to Broad St?

mayday said...

Nice video.

Anonymous said...

No...what exactly is "lower Mid-City" supposed to mean? If it's in keeping with usual New Orleans convention then one would assume what's meant is "Mid-City on the downriver side of Canal St." just like the lower Garden District is downriver from the Garden District. However, isn't almost all of Mid-City on the downriver side of Canal St.?

E said...

Lower Mid-City is a term that predates my involvement with this issue. Some folks call the neighborhood Tulane-Gravier. Others lump it into Greater Mid City. I find Lower Mid-City to be a helpful way to distinguish the area (roughly: south of broad, between canal and I-10) that we're talking about here. It's true, however, that the implications of this medical complex proposal extend throughout Mid City, Treme, and the CBD.

Anonymous said...

"Time and Place in New Orleans" by Richard Campanella refers to the area as "Tulane/Gravier" and shows that the neighborhood, in his definition, actually extends on both sides of Canal St. How, however, is using the prefix "lower..." helpful when the particular area in question where the hospitals are planned is above Canal St., not below it?

E said...

I did not invent the name. People seem to understand what I'm talking about when it is used so I will continue to do so.

Anonymous said...

Non-historic neighborhood names include Vieux Carré, Irish Channel, Lower Garden District and Bywater. Should those names be criticized as well, despite having passed into common usage?

Lower Mid-City lies between the river side of Broad and the lake side of Claiborne. It includes parts of the Faubourgs Treme (sections of Lower Mid-City on the north side of Canal) and Faubourg St. Marie (sections of Lower Mid-City on the south side of Canal).

Mr. Campanella did an outstanding job of documenting local geography but it is unfortunate he obtained inaccurate information from the city's own neighborhood survey. Tulane-Gravier was a term first used by the City of New Orleans in the 1970s to describe an area that encompasses several different historic neighborhoods.

Historic neighborhoods within Tulane-Gravier's arbitrary boundaries include parts of: Faubourgs Hagan, Ste. Marie, Treme and Gravier as well as tracts owned by or disputed by Moore, Griffon, Pontalba, Fleitas, the City of New Orleans and the Canal Bank. The entire area was also claimed and disputed by the Heirs of General Lafayette.

Anonymous said...

"Lower" is a comparative term. How exactly is "lower" Mid-City lower than Mid-City? Simply being south of Mid-City does not and cannot establish that, as, as has been said, "lower" has to do with upriver and downriver relationship, e.g. Lower Coast Algiers.

Anonymous said...

Whether or not one accepts the neighborhood name as legitimate, the area it encompasses has a larger and more far-reaching problem called unrepresented expropriation. The more relevant issue continues to be whether city planning deals have been consummated or predetermined "under the table" or "behind closed doors." Don't think for a minute that the Nagin-VA MOU won't become a template for smash & grab expropriation and development in other, perhaps more valued, neighborhoods.

Anonymous said...

The preservationist contingent has fought some battles in the past and what ended up as a result still turned out OK as far as New Orleans' overall interests. This time the situation is not so clear as far as the preservationists being on the side of right, regardless of their fanatical zeal. One wishes that that zeal had something to do with the emotion of, say, "Louisiana made, Louisiana proud" as in New Orleans' importance to the state and region as a center of commerce and economic activity.

Anonymous said...

For instance, there's all this criticism of LSU. Fine, but realize that LSU IS the state's flagship university; it's part and parcel of the state. It's "us" we're talking about, not some alien body, and we all as Louisianians should have some pride in our own institution and want it to be the best that it can be.