Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Maybe not my place

But I'm not really okay with this.

Juveniles should be tried as juveniles, right?

Call me old fashioned.

12 comments:

Papa Bear said...

I don't even want to talk about the DA's race right now.

Leigh C. said...

Welcome to a whole new world of crime and punishment. The violent crimes are getting more frequent. The number of kids with no qualms about using weapons is also rising. The funding for things that really NEED it, like the schools, the teachers, and social services, is dwindling - but the money for places such as the prisons has never been more abundant. For a society that is loath to create lasting change in the way it treats elementary and secondary education, wages and benefits, and health care, the only thing left is to lock people away who act out of desperation or true violent impulses rather than take a good hard look at what was behind their actions and help them to heal and see the errors of their ways.

And for those who might argue that there are some systems in the prisons to rehabilitate those who are in there, I say bull. What is there is a token gesture towards trying to keep these people from going back in again. There are a lot of repeat offenders heading in and out those revolving doors of the penitentiaries.

To change this decision, Eli, is to change our society. It is also to deny the circumstances in which this decision was made: these kids are being held up as an example right now because our approaches to dealing with crime in this city are so fucked that right now, this is the only way folks such as Riley and Nagin think progress in enforcing the law can be shown.

We are all so screwed.

mominem said...

If the kid lived in Kenner, what was he doing with his two buddies in the French Quarter?

mominem said...
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Papa Bear said...

Piggybacking off of Leigh's comment, the next mayor (and by extension police chief) needs to understand that making examples out of kids and minor crimes DO NOT WORK.

They is a NEED to funded afterschool/summer programs, social services, etc. I was able to stay out of trouble because I was either in a summer program, working or playing sports. These opportunities HAVE to be available for the crime rate to go do.

To take a good quote from a bad movie: "I think a man only needs one thing in life. He just needs someone to love. If you can't give him that, then give him something to hope for. And if you can't give him that, just give him something to do."

If someone doesn't have anyone to love, or anything to hope for, you give them something to do.......then they will find hope and love.

jeffrey said...

Try juveniles as juveniles. It's that simple.

Mominem, are you suggesting that the distance traveled in order to commit the crime should have some bearing on the defendant's standing?

mominem said...
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mominem said...

Nope just wondering about supervision an dparenting.

Anonymous said...

accountability is in short supply here.

Jeffrey said...

It's f-ing crazy is what it is. We're in trouble precisely because we see a 14 year old who killed somebody as a person to punish for life rather than someone who needs help (my heart goes out to both Wendy Byrne as well as the three families of these kids). They are showing us how we're failing.

BeverlyRevelry said...

Thanks for coming out and saying this, E. It's all so broken. And Leigh is so right about the prisons--a boom business for government contractors.

Anonymous said...

What the F! Why not punish him for life. He made a very critical decision at a very early age. One that he should spend the rest of his life being punished for. I do not understand the idea of "helping" a 14 year old murderer. He commited the ultimate offense.